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Album: "Labyrinth" Artist: Los Angeles Guitar Quartet Label: DELOS Released: 1995. Contains: Labyrinth on a theme of Led Zepplin

“For once, here’s an adventurous highly crafted work that insults neither high nor low musical camps. Bravo!"

~AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE, November/December, 1995

“a fascinating six-movement work that successfully reproduces, reinvents, and reassembles Zep’s ”Friends,”…Listen and marvel.” GUITAR PLAYER, October, 1995 “inspired by Led Zeppelin…In seven sections of varying rock and blues oriented passages. It sometimes has a nostalgic charm – I particularly liked the slow moody blues of the fourth part, and the fragmentary nature of the second with its stabbing motifs fighting for elbow room…” Chris Kilvington, CLASSICAL GUITAR, October, 1995 [“Labyrinth,”] written by Ian Krouse, is based on a theme by Led Zeppelin, and if that thought outs you off, don’t let it! The music is written in a contemporary style but is very entertaining and incorporates a number of different guitar styles (including steel-string and slide!).” DISC DOCTOR, Seattle Classic Guitar Society On Line, May, 2000 “The most successful [of the new items] is Krouse’s tongue-in-cheek admixture of rock & roll with his classical compositional ingenuity.” John Schneider, GFA SOUNDBOARD, “JUST FOR THE RECORD,” Fall, 1996





CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO ON THIS ALBUM


Music Alive! - Messages from the Past Artist: St. Cloud State University Wind Ensemble; Richard K. Hansen, conductor Released: Spring, 2001 Label: Westmark, WCD30096 Contains: CRÓNICA DEL ÚLTIMO AÑO EN LA VIDA DE UN MEXICANO





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“Ian Krouse,” Maria Bachmann, violinist, New Zealand Symphony Orchestra
conducted by James Sedares; Sun Young Kim, soprano, Scott Tennant, guitarist;
the Debussy Trio; Dinosaur Annex; KOCH INTERNATIONAL CLASSICS,
released February 22, 2000.

Contains:

RHAPSODY FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA CUANDO SE ABRE
EN LA MAÑANA
(for soprano and guitar)
Thamar Y AMNŌN (for flute, viola and harp)
TIENTOS (for flute, violin, viola and cello)
“Like some of the above, Ian Krouse (b. 1956) seems to have picked up the violin where SamuelBarber set it down. His Rhapsody for Violin and Orchestra is passionate music in which thethirst for beauty is intense. He deploys an achingly lovely melody in the form of a huge arch.This is a gorgeous, dramatic piece that shows that Barber’s school of music is still very muchalive today. It is accompanied by his Cuando se abre en la mañana, a rhapsodic song forsoprano and guitar, and two chamber works, Thamar y Amnón, and Tientos.As one might deduce from the titles of his works, Krouse, who lives in Maryland, has developeda strong predilection for Spanish things (as have I, being married to a Spaniard). His ravishingsong, which sets words written by Federico García Lorca, one of the great Spanish writers andartists of the 20 th century, to music, is completely convincing in the Spanish style in which hehas written it. In fact, it is masterly, as are the two equally accomplished chamber works, allwritten in the 1990’s.” Robert R. Reilly, Samuel Barber and his “School”: American Beauty, Surprised by Beauty, AListener’s Guide to the Recovery of Modern Music, Ignatius Press, 2016. "Ian Krouse is another of the present generation of talented composers who has turned his back on serialism and returned to melody. The beautiful, warmly lyrical Rhapsody for Violin and Orchestra (with Maria Bachman the highly responsive soloist) memorably reveals him as a striking new voice. Thamar y Amnón…is both evocative and erotic…Tientos is… much more exotic, with a wild melismatic flamenco style. The result is ear-tickling, rhythmically pungent and highly imaginative. 'Cuando se abre en la mañana'…is exquisitely realized by Sun Young Kim, vibrantly yet delicately accompanied by Scott Tennant (guitar). All in all a thoroughly rewarding programme, excellently recorded.”

Ivan March and Edward Greenfield, THE PENGUIN GUIDE TO COMPACT DISCS "For all the considerable demands made upon the soloist at this point, there is no real fast music in the piece…the result is lovely…”

~John Story, FANFARE, July/August, 2000 “The “Rhapsody” starts out like the Bruckner 9th, turns into Mahler’s “Adagietto,” and finally becomes the Barber “Violin Concerto.” Since I love that music, you can imagine how delighted I am to have elements of all that together in one piece! It’s gorgeous. I can imagine less sensitive critics rejecting it as “derivative,” but I never understood what was wrong with derivative. I think we need MORE music that sounds like Bruckner, Mahler, and Barber. “'Tientos' is for flute quartet (flute and strings). It sounds Oriental – often the flute seems to be imitating a shakuhachi. About 5 minutes in, it starts to sound Spanish, and the strings imitate a guitar. The flute is the singer, and it sounds to me like flamenco. Oddly enough, it ends up Sibelius – unmistakably so. It was written in about three weeks (and it’s a 23-minute piece. I am convinced that inspired music is written quickly.) Tientos…is one of his most original works. “…you’ll be swept away in these resplendent works and performances. What a wonderful surprise this is! Just when you fall back into thinking that all the good music is old music, the spirit falls on an unexpected candidate living in – of all places – Los Angeles."

~Donald R. Vroon, Editor in Chief, AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE, July/August, 2000 “Here’s a daring pick for this month, but I hope you’ll be swept away in these resplendent works and performances. Krouse’s “Rhapsody” thrills with its inflamed ecstasy for 21 minutes. Bachmann and ensemble are rapturous. “Cuando [se abre en a mañana], a short work for soprano and guitar, and the erotic tale of “Thamar y Amnón,’ (in which the Debussy Trio infuses a fitting sensuality) were both inspired by poet Garcia Lorca. “Tientos” is highly charged like the “Rhapsody,” but here Krouse adds the darker fury of Flamenco: violent spikes abound like the angry foot stomps of a dancer. The opening outburst becomes an elegy of loss with occasional flare-ups of florid sobs from the flute. Based on a 16th century Spanish song, it finally throws its head up high, demanding dignity in its torment. Our string trio and flute go full throttle with intense, blazing emotion…Careful - - you might get burned!

~Bill Stibor, Nebraska Public Radio, WET PAINT, CD of the Month, June, 2000
“Ian Krouse is a thoroughgoing Romantic… really lovely…”

~John Story, FANFARE, July/August, 2000

“Ian Krouse writes in an eclectic yet approachable style, a grab-bag of rhapsodic Romanticism and ethnic-spiced melodies and rhythms. That inspiration was certainly palpable in the impressive programme of his music released on Koch last year…Highly recommended for the works of Ian Krouse, one of the most communicative and intriguing young composers on the music scene today.”

~Lawrence A. Johnson, GRAMOPHONE, Awards Issue 2001 “Written in a clear but not submissive tonal idiom, all four works share a fierce, dark, passionate character, largely inspired by Federico García Lorca’s poetry. At the beginning, the Rhapsody for Violin and Orchestra sounds like “Barber’s Adagio meets flamenco,” before finding a more personal tone with the appearance of the violin. The work’s dramatic outbursts are built up with generous help from keyboard percussion, to great effect. The lyrical, profusely ornamental solo part floats over the orchestral fabric with grace and poignant intensity. Written for flute, viola, and harp, Thamar y Amnón develops striking colors in a single, fast-paced 10-minute movement – a valuable addition to the repertoire for this seductive instrumental combination. Cuando se abre en la mañana, a song for soprano and guitar on a text of García Lorca, dips even more directly into Spanish folk music, and almost could be mist­­­ake for the real thing. Finally, Tientos explores the same improvisatory paths and energetic moods of the three previous pieces, even though somewhat softened by the mixing of a flute and a string trio. All performers show a clear affinity for Krouse’s violent but seductive sound world, with a special mention to violinist Maria Bachmann in the Rhapsody. The efficient recordings provide by Koch give the music its full physical impact.” Luca Sabbatini, CLASSICS TODAY, 2000





CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO ON THIS ALBUM


“Ian Krouse,” Maria Bachmann, violinist, New Zealand Symphony Orchestra
conducted by James Sedares; Sun Young Kim, soprano, Scott Tennant, guitarist;
the Debussy Trio; Dinosaur Annex; KOCH INTERNATIONAL CLASSICS,
released February 22, 2000.

Contains:

RHAPSODY FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA CUANDO SE ABRE
EN LA MAÑANA
(for soprano and guitar)
Thamar Y AMNŌN (for flute, viola and harp)
TIENTOS (for flute, violin, viola and cello)
“Like some of the above, Ian Krouse (b. 1956) seems to have picked up the violin where SamuelBarber set it down. His Rhapsody for Violin and Orchestra is passionate music in which thethirst for beauty is intense. He deploys an achingly lovely melody in the form of a huge arch.This is a gorgeous, dramatic piece that shows that Barber’s school of music is still very muchalive today. It is accompanied by his Cuando se abre en la mañana, a rhapsodic song forsoprano and guitar, and two chamber works, Thamar y Amnón, and Tientos.As one might deduce from the titles of his works, Krouse, who lives in Maryland, has developeda strong predilection for Spanish things (as have I, being married to a Spaniard). His ravishingsong, which sets words written by Federico García Lorca, one of the great Spanish writers andartists of the 20 th century, to music, is completely convincing in the Spanish style in which hehas written it. In fact, it is masterly, as are the two equally accomplished chamber works, allwritten in the 1990’s.” Robert R. Reilly, Samuel Barber and his “School”: American Beauty, Surprised by Beauty, AListener’s Guide to the Recovery of Modern Music, Ignatius Press, 2016. "Ian Krouse is another of the present generation of talented composers who has turned his back on serialism and returned to melody. The beautiful, warmly lyrical Rhapsody for Violin and Orchestra (with Maria Bachman the highly responsive soloist) memorably reveals him as a striking new voice. Thamar y Amnón…is both evocative and erotic…Tientos is… much more exotic, with a wild melismatic flamenco style. The result is ear-tickling, rhythmically pungent and highly imaginative. 'Cuando se abre en la mañana'…is exquisitely realized by Sun Young Kim, vibrantly yet delicately accompanied by Scott Tennant (guitar). All in all a thoroughly rewarding programme, excellently recorded.”

Ivan March and Edward Greenfield, THE PENGUIN GUIDE TO COMPACT DISCS "For all the considerable demands made upon the soloist at this point, there is no real fast music in the piece…the result is lovely…”

~John Story, FANFARE, July/August, 2000 “The “Rhapsody” starts out like the Bruckner 9th, turns into Mahler’s “Adagietto,” and finally becomes the Barber “Violin Concerto.” Since I love that music, you can imagine how delighted I am to have elements of all that together in one piece! It’s gorgeous. I can imagine less sensitive critics rejecting it as “derivative,” but I never understood what was wrong with derivative. I think we need MORE music that sounds like Bruckner, Mahler, and Barber. “'Tientos' is for flute quartet (flute and strings). It sounds Oriental – often the flute seems to be imitating a shakuhachi. About 5 minutes in, it starts to sound Spanish, and the strings imitate a guitar. The flute is the singer, and it sounds to me like flamenco. Oddly enough, it ends up Sibelius – unmistakably so. It was written in about three weeks (and it’s a 23-minute piece. I am convinced that inspired music is written quickly.) Tientos…is one of his most original works. “…you’ll be swept away in these resplendent works and performances. What a wonderful surprise this is! Just when you fall back into thinking that all the good music is old music, the spirit falls on an unexpected candidate living in – of all places – Los Angeles."

~Donald R. Vroon, Editor in Chief, AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE, July/August, 2000 “Here’s a daring pick for this month, but I hope you’ll be swept away in these resplendent works and performances. Krouse’s “Rhapsody” thrills with its inflamed ecstasy for 21 minutes. Bachmann and ensemble are rapturous. “Cuando [se abre en a mañana], a short work for soprano and guitar, and the erotic tale of “Thamar y Amnón,’ (in which the Debussy Trio infuses a fitting sensuality) were both inspired by poet Garcia Lorca. “Tientos” is highly charged like the “Rhapsody,” but here Krouse adds the darker fury of Flamenco: violent spikes abound like the angry foot stomps of a dancer. The opening outburst becomes an elegy of loss with occasional flare-ups of florid sobs from the flute. Based on a 16th century Spanish song, it finally throws its head up high, demanding dignity in its torment. Our string trio and flute go full throttle with intense, blazing emotion…Careful - - you might get burned!

~Bill Stibor, Nebraska Public Radio, WET PAINT, CD of the Month, June, 2000
“Ian Krouse is a thoroughgoing Romantic… really lovely…”

~John Story, FANFARE, July/August, 2000

“Ian Krouse writes in an eclectic yet approachable style, a grab-bag of rhapsodic Romanticism and ethnic-spiced melodies and rhythms. That inspiration was certainly palpable in the impressive programme of his music released on Koch last year…Highly recommended for the works of Ian Krouse, one of the most communicative and intriguing young composers on the music scene today.”

~Lawrence A. Johnson, GRAMOPHONE, Awards Issue 2001 “Written in a clear but not submissive tonal idiom, all four works share a fierce, dark, passionate character, largely inspired by Federico García Lorca’s poetry. At the beginning, the Rhapsody for Violin and Orchestra sounds like “Barber’s Adagio meets flamenco,” before finding a more personal tone with the appearance of the violin. The work’s dramatic outbursts are built up with generous help from keyboard percussion, to great effect. The lyrical, profusely ornamental solo part floats over the orchestral fabric with grace and poignant intensity. Written for flute, viola, and harp, Thamar y Amnón develops striking colors in a single, fast-paced 10-minute movement – a valuable addition to the repertoire for this seductive instrumental combination. Cuando se abre en la mañana, a song for soprano and guitar on a text of García Lorca, dips even more directly into Spanish folk music, and almost could be mist­­­ake for the real thing. Finally, Tientos explores the same improvisatory paths and energetic moods of the three previous pieces, even though somewhat softened by the mixing of a flute and a string trio. All performers show a clear affinity for Krouse’s violent but seductive sound world, with a special mention to violinist Maria Bachmann in the Rhapsody. The efficient recordings provide by Koch give the music its full physical impact.” Luca Sabbatini, CLASSICS TODAY, 2000





CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO ON THIS ALBUM


Music Alive! - Messages from the Past Artist: St. Cloud State University Wind Ensemble; Richard K. Hansen, conductor Released: Spring, 2001 Label: Westmark, WCD30096 Contains: CRÓNICA DEL ÚLTIMO AÑO EN LA VIDA DE UN MEXICANO





CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO ON THIS ALBUM


Album: "Labyrinth" Artist: Los Angeles Guitar Quartet Label: DELOS Released: 1995. Contains: Labyrinth on a theme of Led Zepplin

“For once, here’s an adventurous highly crafted work that insults neither high nor low musical camps. Bravo!"

~AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE, November/December, 1995

“a fascinating six-movement work that successfully reproduces, reinvents, and reassembles Zep’s ”Friends,”…Listen and marvel.” GUITAR PLAYER, October, 1995 “inspired by Led Zeppelin…In seven sections of varying rock and blues oriented passages. It sometimes has a nostalgic charm – I particularly liked the slow moody blues of the fourth part, and the fragmentary nature of the second with its stabbing motifs fighting for elbow room…” Chris Kilvington, CLASSICAL GUITAR, October, 1995 [“Labyrinth,”] written by Ian Krouse, is based on a theme by Led Zeppelin, and if that thought outs you off, don’t let it! The music is written in a contemporary style but is very entertaining and incorporates a number of different guitar styles (including steel-string and slide!).” DISC DOCTOR, Seattle Classic Guitar Society On Line, May, 2000 “The most successful [of the new items] is Krouse’s tongue-in-cheek admixture of rock & roll with his classical compositional ingenuity.” John Schneider, GFA SOUNDBOARD, “JUST FOR THE RECORD,” Fall, 1996





CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO ON THIS ALBUM


Album: "Labyrinth" Artist: Los Angeles Guitar Quartet Label: DELOS Released: 1995. Contains: Labyrinth on a theme of Led Zepplin

“For once, here’s an adventurous highly crafted work that insults neither high nor low musical camps. Bravo!"

~AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE, November/December, 1995

“a fascinating six-movement work that successfully reproduces, reinvents, and reassembles Zep’s ”Friends,”…Listen and marvel.” GUITAR PLAYER, October, 1995 “inspired by Led Zeppelin…In seven sections of varying rock and blues oriented passages. It sometimes has a nostalgic charm – I particularly liked the slow moody blues of the fourth part, and the fragmentary nature of the second with its stabbing motifs fighting for elbow room…” Chris Kilvington, CLASSICAL GUITAR, October, 1995 [“Labyrinth,”] written by Ian Krouse, is based on a theme by Led Zeppelin, and if that thought outs you off, don’t let it! The music is written in a contemporary style but is very entertaining and incorporates a number of different guitar styles (including steel-string and slide!).” DISC DOCTOR, Seattle Classic Guitar Society On Line, May, 2000 “The most successful [of the new items] is Krouse’s tongue-in-cheek admixture of rock & roll with his classical compositional ingenuity.” John Schneider, GFA SOUNDBOARD, “JUST FOR THE RECORD,” Fall, 1996





CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO ON THIS ALBUM


“Ian Krouse,” Maria Bachmann, violinist, New Zealand Symphony Orchestra
conducted by James Sedares; Sun Young Kim, soprano, Scott Tennant, guitarist;
the Debussy Trio; Dinosaur Annex; KOCH INTERNATIONAL CLASSICS,
released February 22, 2000.

Contains:

RHAPSODY FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA CUANDO SE ABRE
EN LA MAÑANA
(for soprano and guitar)
Thamar Y AMNŌN (for flute, viola and harp)
TIENTOS (for flute, violin, viola and cello)
“Like some of the above, Ian Krouse (b. 1956) seems to have picked up the violin where SamuelBarber set it down. His Rhapsody for Violin and Orchestra is passionate music in which thethirst for beauty is intense. He deploys an achingly lovely melody in the form of a huge arch.This is a gorgeous, dramatic piece that shows that Barber’s school of music is still very muchalive today. It is accompanied by his Cuando se abre en la mañana, a rhapsodic song forsoprano and guitar, and two chamber works, Thamar y Amnón, and Tientos.As one might deduce from the titles of his works, Krouse, who lives in Maryland, has developeda strong predilection for Spanish things (as have I, being married to a Spaniard). His ravishingsong, which sets words written by Federico García Lorca, one of the great Spanish writers andartists of the 20 th century, to music, is completely convincing in the Spanish style in which hehas written it. In fact, it is masterly, as are the two equally accomplished chamber works, allwritten in the 1990’s.” Robert R. Reilly, Samuel Barber and his “School”: American Beauty, Surprised by Beauty, AListener’s Guide to the Recovery of Modern Music, Ignatius Press, 2016. "Ian Krouse is another of the present generation of talented composers who has turned his back on serialism and returned to melody. The beautiful, warmly lyrical Rhapsody for Violin and Orchestra (with Maria Bachman the highly responsive soloist) memorably reveals him as a striking new voice. Thamar y Amnón…is both evocative and erotic…Tientos is… much more exotic, with a wild melismatic flamenco style. The result is ear-tickling, rhythmically pungent and highly imaginative. 'Cuando se abre en la mañana'…is exquisitely realized by Sun Young Kim, vibrantly yet delicately accompanied by Scott Tennant (guitar). All in all a thoroughly rewarding programme, excellently recorded.”

Ivan March and Edward Greenfield, THE PENGUIN GUIDE TO COMPACT DISCS "For all the considerable demands made upon the soloist at this point, there is no real fast music in the piece…the result is lovely…”

~John Story, FANFARE, July/August, 2000 “The “Rhapsody” starts out like the Bruckner 9th, turns into Mahler’s “Adagietto,” and finally becomes the Barber “Violin Concerto.” Since I love that music, you can imagine how delighted I am to have elements of all that together in one piece! It’s gorgeous. I can imagine less sensitive critics rejecting it as “derivative,” but I never understood what was wrong with derivative. I think we need MORE music that sounds like Bruckner, Mahler, and Barber. “'Tientos' is for flute quartet (flute and strings). It sounds Oriental – often the flute seems to be imitating a shakuhachi. About 5 minutes in, it starts to sound Spanish, and the strings imitate a guitar. The flute is the singer, and it sounds to me like flamenco. Oddly enough, it ends up Sibelius – unmistakably so. It was written in about three weeks (and it’s a 23-minute piece. I am convinced that inspired music is written quickly.) Tientos…is one of his most original works. “…you’ll be swept away in these resplendent works and performances. What a wonderful surprise this is! Just when you fall back into thinking that all the good music is old music, the spirit falls on an unexpected candidate living in – of all places – Los Angeles."

~Donald R. Vroon, Editor in Chief, AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE, July/August, 2000 “Here’s a daring pick for this month, but I hope you’ll be swept away in these resplendent works and performances. Krouse’s “Rhapsody” thrills with its inflamed ecstasy for 21 minutes. Bachmann and ensemble are rapturous. “Cuando [se abre en a mañana], a short work for soprano and guitar, and the erotic tale of “Thamar y Amnón,’ (in which the Debussy Trio infuses a fitting sensuality) were both inspired by poet Garcia Lorca. “Tientos” is highly charged like the “Rhapsody,” but here Krouse adds the darker fury of Flamenco: violent spikes abound like the angry foot stomps of a dancer. The opening outburst becomes an elegy of loss with occasional flare-ups of florid sobs from the flute. Based on a 16th century Spanish song, it finally throws its head up high, demanding dignity in its torment. Our string trio and flute go full throttle with intense, blazing emotion…Careful - - you might get burned!

~Bill Stibor, Nebraska Public Radio, WET PAINT, CD of the Month, June, 2000
“Ian Krouse is a thoroughgoing Romantic… really lovely…”

~John Story, FANFARE, July/August, 2000

“Ian Krouse writes in an eclectic yet approachable style, a grab-bag of rhapsodic Romanticism and ethnic-spiced melodies and rhythms. That inspiration was certainly palpable in the impressive programme of his music released on Koch last year…Highly recommended for the works of Ian Krouse, one of the most communicative and intriguing young composers on the music scene today.”

~Lawrence A. Johnson, GRAMOPHONE, Awards Issue 2001 “Written in a clear but not submissive tonal idiom, all four works share a fierce, dark, passionate character, largely inspired by Federico García Lorca’s poetry. At the beginning, the Rhapsody for Violin and Orchestra sounds like “Barber’s Adagio meets flamenco,” before finding a more personal tone with the appearance of the violin. The work’s dramatic outbursts are built up with generous help from keyboard percussion, to great effect. The lyrical, profusely ornamental solo part floats over the orchestral fabric with grace and poignant intensity. Written for flute, viola, and harp, Thamar y Amnón develops striking colors in a single, fast-paced 10-minute movement – a valuable addition to the repertoire for this seductive instrumental combination. Cuando se abre en la mañana, a song for soprano and guitar on a text of García Lorca, dips even more directly into Spanish folk music, and almost could be mist­­­ake for the real thing. Finally, Tientos explores the same improvisatory paths and energetic moods of the three previous pieces, even though somewhat softened by the mixing of a flute and a string trio. All performers show a clear affinity for Krouse’s violent but seductive sound world, with a special mention to violinist Maria Bachmann in the Rhapsody. The efficient recordings provide by Koch give the music its full physical impact.” Luca Sabbatini, CLASSICS TODAY, 2000





CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO ON THIS ALBUM


Music Alive! - Messages from the Past Artist: St. Cloud State University Wind Ensemble; Richard K. Hansen, conductor Released: Spring, 2001 Label: Westmark, WCD30096 Contains: CRÓNICA DEL ÚLTIMO AÑO EN LA VIDA DE UN MEXICANO





CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO ON THIS ALBUM


Album: "Labyrinth" Artist: Los Angeles Guitar Quartet Label: DELOS Released: 1995. Contains: Labyrinth on a theme of Led Zepplin

“For once, here’s an adventurous highly crafted work that insults neither high nor low musical camps. Bravo!"

~AMERICAN RECORD GUIDE, November/December, 1995

“a fascinating six-movement work that successfully reproduces, reinvents, and reassembles Zep’s ”Friends,”…Listen and marvel.” GUITAR PLAYER, October, 1995 “inspired by Led Zeppelin…In seven sections of varying rock and blues oriented passages. It sometimes has a nostalgic charm – I particularly liked the slow moody blues of the fourth part, and the fragmentary nature of the second with its stabbing motifs fighting for elbow room…” Chris Kilvington, CLASSICAL GUITAR, October, 1995 [“Labyrinth,”] written by Ian Krouse, is based on a theme by Led Zeppelin, and if that thought outs you off, don’t let it! The music is written in a contemporary style but is very entertaining and incorporates a number of different guitar styles (including steel-string and slide!).” DISC DOCTOR, Seattle Classic Guitar Society On Line, May, 2000 “The most successful [of the new items] is Krouse’s tongue-in-cheek admixture of rock & roll with his classical compositional ingenuity.” John Schneider, GFA SOUNDBOARD, “JUST FOR THE RECORD,” Fall, 1996





CLICK HERE FOR MORE INFO ON THIS ALBUM


Music Alive! - Messages from the Past Artist: St. Cloud State University Wind Ensemble; Richard K. Hansen, conductor Released: Spring, 2001 Label: Westmark, WCD30096 Contains: CRÓNICA DEL ÚLTIMO AÑO EN LA VIDA DE UN MEXICANO





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